Feedback from reflective observers for a better 360 experience
reflective trees image: a metaphor for better feedback

my360plus: achieving the best reflective feedback

Feedback is my focus this week. I’m taking a deep dive into 360 multi-rater feedback tools, because I want to give the best possible support to my leadership and coaching clients. Reflecting what observers have said in their feedback.  But given that it’s experienced leaders and managers at the receiving end of 360 feedback tools, I have a burning question: why do we call the people who give the feedback ‘raters’?

I’m sure you’ve got more experience than me, and your comments are most welcome. But hear me out:

‘Raters’ can’t be the right word, can it?

Quick dictionary definition (thank you merriam-webster.com) of rater: “a person who estimates or determines a rating”. So far, so clear. But there’s also ‘rater reliability’. Yes, it’s a thing apparently. It’s the degree of agreement, or consistency between raters.

We’re not talking Olympic skating, or Strictly Come Dancing here. Those judges are experts in their field. If they hold up the score they also get to explain why they’ve given the mark they have, based on years of experience in the subject.

My point is that we have little or no confidence in the knowledge and experience of ‘raters’ in the subject matter about which they’re being asked, unless they’ve been prepared, or had training, first.  We certainly can’t expect consistency without it.

Participants are going to get feedback which may be challenging. They’re going to be asked to invest time and effort in a personal development plan.  The least we can do is improve the experience for them…

my360plus doesn’t call them ‘raters’; because they’re Observers.

Let’s take presentation skills. Sure I know if my colleague bores me when s/he stands up and speaks to a powerpoint. Phrases like “I know you can’t see the detail here but….” are the kiss of death.

I remember a presentation where the boss stood up dressed in a hi-vis jacket to make a safety point. But if the question asks how good a communicator my boss is, does a rater base their response on that one memorable time?

In the my360plus behaviours, based on the Schroder high-performance model, presentation skills are about getting your ideas over.  Showing you’ve done the research.  Presenting different options.  Influencing, not just railroading, the final decision.

Evidence-based feedback

So asking how often we see these behaviours makes perfect sense.

And that’s why “Why do we call them raters?” was my number one question when we invested in the my360plus feedback tool. I’m grateful that no-one mocked me for it. And I learned three things:

  • The first was that my360plus don’t call them ‘raters’; they’re Observers
  • The my360plus questions are about how often a behaviour is observed
  • They’re Observers because the questions ask them about what they observe in others;
    not how they rate others.

Let’s reduce bias

‘Observer’ reduces bias, and it takes out pre-conceived notions of what’s ‘good’. It makes you think. From an objective viewpoint it reduces reliance on rater reliability. It’s a shift from how we rate people, what we think about them, to what we observe about them.

My first step is to experience my360plus from a participant’s point of view.

I answered the questions, and colleagues are giving me feedback right now. Then I get to see the report and experience someone giving me feedback, before I plan a year’s leadership development goals supported by the my360plus social feedback system and some 1-1 coaching. As I say: scary and exciting.

Let’s prepare observers

From a customer point of view, this experience will lead to training programmes for observers and my360plus administrators, so that everyone feels confident to give reflective feedback based on observation, and the participant experience can be better.  We’ve got videos dotted around this site to support the ongoing development plans, and other ‘how to’ content, but I know we can do better.

So if you’ve had similar experiences, whether from being rated, or giving coaching and feedback to leaders using these 360 multi-rater feedback tools, or you want to help create the best possible training programme for my360plus participants and observers, I’d love to hear and learn from you.

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360 degree feedback tools – get the best from your investment
Delivering the my360plus feedback and report

getting the best from the my360plus investment

You’ve invested in your 360 degree feedback tool; set up the process and briefed the participants on how it all works. Your HR team stand ready to coach your leaders and managers on their reports. So what could possibly go wrong?

Let’s be blunt.  With any 360, it’s rubbish in, rubbish out. So it’s important to get the best from your observers and coaches, not just the participants themselves.

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The workplace has all the ingredients for conflict to boil over.

The Sunday Times recently published an article about the major problems conflict can cause in the workplace, especially if avoided by managers and leaders.  Studies have shown that up to 40% of an executive’s time is spent dealing with conflicts.  Another study shows that more than 65% of performance problems result from difficult employee relationships.  The ability to manage conflict can define a good and a bad leader.

We are all, by nature, emotional creatures, and it would be impossible to conceive that all differences between us could be avoided.  The workplace breeds a climate rife for blowing conflicts out of proportion.  It brings together so many different aspects of society – be it through differences in age, experience, upbringing or culture – and mixes them together in a close environment.  To use a cooking analogy, rarely do recipes succeed when ingredients are randomly chosen and combined without forethought and careful planning!  The resulting dish can certainly be unpalatable!

So how to do we ‘choose the correct ingredients’ and ‘mix them’ together for a successful recipe?

  • Recognise that conflict exists and seek it out.  By addressing it early it is possible to avoid an escalation.  However don’t look for arguments for argument’s sake – analyse what is important and likely to impact on performance.
  • Set the ground rules.  There should be a clear understanding of what is acceptable behaviour.
  • Effective communication. Clear, concise, accurate and timely communication of information will help ease both the number and severity of conflicts.
  • Use empathy (a Schroder High Performance behaviour) to understand individual motivations and attitudes.  Involved parties often have personal agendas that may conflict.  Also remember what might seem trivial to one person, might be a source of stress to another.
  • If possible, approach conflict from the perspective of taking the action that will help others best achieve their goals.  Always look for a win-win solution if possible.
  • Identify the strengths of his individual team members and clearly communicate their roles and contributions towards a common goal.
  • As we often discuss in our my360plus blogs, regular feedback is essential towards creating a more open and constructive working environment, with increased self-awareness.  Openness in the workplace is a vital ingredient, essential for encouraging creativity, improving systems and making team members feel valued.  If fear of conflict is acting as a barrier to this then productivity will be impacted.  Recognise that differences in opinions are not always a negative.
  • Have relationship and team building events.  These are always valuable whether you are building a new team, integrating new members to an existing team, or need to refresh relationships within more established groups.
  • Don’t put your head in the sand.  Conflict rarely resolves itself and will normally escalate if not dealt with proactively and properly.
  • Don’t get involved in the ‘drama’. Maintain neutrality and don’t tolerate self-serving behaviour.

Back to the cooking analogy – by quickly recognising when an ingredient is damaging the taste, it needs to quickly be removed, or counteracted with a remedy that removes the bad taste.  Ignoring it may result in burnt offerings.

 

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La Rentrée: this time of year we all go ‘back to school’

My children have been back at school a few weeks now and we have just about settled back into the routine of it all. My eldest son is now at secondary school and has been subjected to various assessment tests to determine which sets he goes into for the key subjects.  This process of working out his strengths and areas for development reminded me, of course, of my ‘day job’.  However, it struck me as no coincidence that my360plus saw a marked increase in demand for 360 degree profiling in September.

I think that it is has been ingrained in us that this time of year we all go ‘back to school’. In the world of work there is often a shift from the slower summer mindset to a more focussed attitude.  The French even have a word for this: ‘La Rentrée’.  Many French people are on vacation for all or part of August, which means that la rentrée, in September, is when everyone is returning home and going back to work.

So as we look at the year ahead, it is a good time to analyse what additional skills or training might be useful, so what should we be considering?

  • Talk to our managers and discuss any available training that is related to the job we are doing, or future projects we will be involved in.
  • Do we have a good self-awareness regarding our skillset?  We should talk to our managers, peers and teams to gain their views.
  • Consider what we are naturally good at and would like to develop and use more, rather than just the things we need to improve.
  • Another option is mentoring or being mentored, providing the chance to share skills and experience with colleagues.
  • If appropriate, talk to our managers regarding changing some responsibilities in order to develop new skills.
  • Create a clear development path for the months ahead with distinct goals.

So how could my360plus profiling help you now?

  • It creates a simple, straightforward, easy-to-understand profile of strengths and areas for development.
  • Our 360 tool is straightforward, quick and easy to use online.
  • It is an efficient and cost effective process.
  • Our approach does not stop with the production of a report.  my360plus sets up ongoing real-time coaching with plain English suggestions on what to work on and how.
  • The development is measurable and is directly linked to improved performance.
  • The approach is proven, and is underpinned by robust science.

 

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Inspiring Leadership. Richard Branson breaks the rules again!

“My philosophy is, put your employees first, your customers second and your investors third and, in the end, everyone will be happy.”

Virgin Boss, Sir Richard Branson, has nailed another PR coup.  Setting the cat amongst the pigeons and challenging employers to discard the traditional holiday contractual allowance, he has dared to suggest that staff should be able to take as much holiday as they like.

At first glance this is a great way of empowering the workforce and trusting them to have more ownership of their work-life balance. I will watch his ‘experiment’ with interest as he has initially rolled out this new policy to 170 of this staff (his total workforce has more than 50000 employees around the world).  The clever proviso is that any absence should not damage business or ‘their careers’.

Sir Richard Branson is a great case study in modern leadership, and we often cite him at my360plus as a great example when we are discussing the ‘involve’ and ‘inspire’ clusters of high performance leadership behaviours:

Involving Leadership Behaviours:

  • Encourages a ‘hands-off’ approach to management so that employees make their own decisions.  Branson trusts and empowers his teams.
  • Makes employees feel truly valued and appreciated. This increases company loyalty and provides a true sense of purpose.
  • Encourages communication and feedback. Did you know that he even gives out his phone number to all employees encouraging ideas, suggestions or comments?!
  • Actively listens: he is very approachable, and is able to connect with people at all levels.  Feedback is truly encouraged and valued.
  • Seeks to always look for the best in people.  He moves people into different jobs within the organisation to transfer, develop and maximise skills.

Inspiring Leadership Behaviours:

  • Encourages his employees to be innovative and take risks.  Branson himself is not afraid to make mistakes, taking on challenges, demonstrating determination and persistence to bounce back and learn.
  • Promotes a clear vision that is consistently and clearly communicated – the ‘Virgin Brand’.
  • Builds confidence in the company’s potential for success.
  • Is a role model. Branson is motivating, energetic and ‘walks the talk’.  “If you love what you do and if you believe in what you do, others will share your enthusiasm.”
  • Has an innovative approach to business: likes to break ‘rules’ and do things differently.
  • Values and rewards truly exceptional customer service.

“You don’t learn to walk by following rules,” Branson says. “You learn by doing, and by falling over.”

 

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The Scottish Referendum highlights the pros and cons of complex decision making.

The big decision faced by the Scottish dominates the news at the moment; as the outcome of the impending referendum currently appears too close to call.  The answer each individual has to give might just a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’, but the complexity of the decision making process makes it far from black and white.

The basis of any good decision is the depth and breadth of the information available.  In this instance it is not for lack of relevant information and advice, but because of all of the unknowns. Politicians are scurrying around making firm ‘promises’ regarding Scotland’s future, but they can’t escape the key factor: the future is certainly unknown. Therefore making a decision seems risky.

Complex decision making, full of unknowns, is prevalent in the business world.  It is accepted that often there is no ‘right’ answer.  However, business leaders recognise that with uncertainty also comes opportunity and, for Scotland, whichever way the vote goes, change is now inevitable.  The issues that are the most important to the electorate have been shaken to the surface and won’t be allowed to continue on in the same ‘old’ ways.

So that’s a good thing – surely?!  To sweep away the old cobwebs and refresh; to identify the critical issues and review better or different ways to address them; to regularly adjust the direction.

We know that businesses that constantly review and adapt are more likely to succeed.  Armed with rich information and strong diagnostics, a good leader will encourage flexible thinking and scenario planning throughout their business.  This is all about seeing things differently, trying new ways, and looking at things from a different perspective.  My360plus encourages businesses to challenge the ‘this is the way we’ve always done it’ mentality.  The ability to acknowledge alternatives is a vital leadership skill, proven to increase performance, and that is why it is one of the key high performance behaviours that my360plus rates and coaches.

The Scottish people have been discussing the pros and cons of Independence or Union for the best part of 300 years. They are a well informed electorate.  Whatever the result on 18th September, Scotland will move forward with a clearer, cleaner vision, with a more engaged population.  This can only be positive.

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10 steps to better decision making

How do we get our heads around all that is going on around us, so we can create powerful ideas, solve problems and make decisions?  Effective decision making involves three high performance leadership behaviours: ‘information search’, ‘idea creation’ and ‘flexible thinking’.

These are the ten key steps involved:

Information Search:

  1. Clearly define the situation or goal.
  2. Create a value for research and knowledge gathering throughout your team.
  3. Collect as much information as possible from a board range of sources, from both ‘within’ and ‘outside’ of the situation to get a wide rich viewpoint of what’s going on. Governmental regulations, legal developments, market conditions, economic factors, market research and technological developments can all affect the situation.

Idea Creation

  1. Form ideas and judgements from the information available.  Link in the information from the wider environment to make better sense of the situation.  Don’t get bogged down by the details – look at the ‘whole’.
  2. Involve others to encourage the generation of ideas. Brainstorm all alternatives.  Entertain all ideas at this stage.

Flexible Thinking

  1. Consider at least two viable solutions or options.  Hold options in ‘parallel’ not ‘in series’.
  2. Compare the pros and cons of all solutions simultaneously.
  3. Consider the consequences and impact of each option.  Who does it impact?  Is it achievable? Are the timescales realistic?

Decision Time

  1. Based on your analysis, choose the best possible option, form an action plan and implement your decision. Be specific and set measurable targets.
  2. Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.  Always have a backup plan.  Implement a process for continuous review so, if new information arises, you are ready to revise and adapt.

 

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Influence and mastering the art of the Win-Win.

A classic case of win-win.  This morning, as I booked a courier online, I noticed the option to select ‘drop at post office’.  Clever – I don’t have to wait in tomorrow for the collection, the parcel is on its way a day earlier, and the courier has one less pick up in his already busy day.  Everyone is happy.

This is just one example of how win-win solutions are woven into our day to day lives: look around you!  The branded  sports players providing the clothing companies with marketing; BBQ food discounted at the supermarkets in the hot weather; contractors rewarded with a bonus if they complete a project on time – I am sure you can think of many more examples, which show how advantageous a truly beneficial supplier-customer/ business-business partnership can be.

One of Schroder’s High Performance Leadership Behaviours is ‘Influence’ and it can be very powerful, having a positive impact on individual, team or organisational performance.

So what is influencing?

  • It is the art of developing ideas and solutions that are mutually beneficial.
  • The ability to affect another’s attitudes, beliefs or behaviours.
  • Persuading without using exertion or force of formal authority.
  • Allowing the ‘influencee’ to believe that they are acting in their own best interests. 

What are the benefits?

  • Strategic alliances, joint goals and shared interests which foster a positive climate of co-operation rather than domination or imposition.
  • It builds confidence and excitement for the project or goal
  • The formation of alliances to ensure long-term buy in.
  • Socialised power (as opposed to centralised around one or a few people).

How to Influence?

  1. Define the situation and identify the goal.
  2. Identify who needs to be influenced and determine what makes them tick. The High Performance Behaviour ‘Empathy’ plays a key part here as it is vital to find out what is really important to the other party.
  3. With this knowledge the next step is to work out the most appropriate way to get their buy-in, and to know which skills or behaviours are best to employ: reason, friendliness and bargaining are primary strategies. Back up strategies include assertiveness, higher authority, coalition or sanctions.

Work today gets done in an environment where people don’t just ask “What should I do?”  But “Why should I do it?”  To answer this question effectively is to persuade.” Harvard Business Review

Empathy and Influencing are two of the behaviours that we rate and coach at my360plus.  For some more information please contact us.

 

 

 

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Is Mark Carney using the right measurement tools to track performance?

At a conference recently the speaker was Sir Howard Davies, who we hear about most often as the Chairman of the UK Airports Commission, looking at options for Heathrow, Gatwick and Boris Island.

In the 1990s he was also a Deputy Governor of the Bank of England, sitting on the Monetary Policy Committee which sets interest rates.

He is a hugely informed and engaging speaker, and he certainly didn’t hold back from voicing his opinions on the current direction of the Bank of England, his former employer.   He was particularly critical of aspects of the policy of ‘forward guidance’, where the new Governor, Mark Carney, has committed to give advanced warning of any future changes of interest rate.

He wasn’t so critical of the idea of giving advanced warning in principle, but rather the measure chosen: the bank has stated that interest rates would need to rise when the employment rate falls below 7%.

Davies’ view was that employment rate was a very poorly chosen measure for this purpose. He stated that historically the Bank of England has been very poor at predicting this rate.  (Indeed this has turned out to be the case in the early months of the policy.)  By very publicly hanging the policy on only one notoriously tricky measure the Bank, in his view, has made a grave error.

Listening to this it highlighted the importance of how essential it is for leaders to choose the right control measures to track and to steer their businesses by.  This behaviour is called ‘Quality Measurement’.

Quality Measurement is one of the leadership behaviours that we rate and coach at my360 plus.  It is a behaviour that has a proven direct correlation to performance.  There is a specific focus on measuring things that lead to better value for the customer, and therefore greater long term organisational success.

Here are some of our ‘top tips’ to help improve your Quality Measurement:

  • What can you do to better monitor the current project or work you are doing?
  • How can you make sure you are making progress?
  • Do you ensure individual, team and divisional objectives are regularly set?
  • How can you improve the monitoring of your activities over the coming week, month and three months?
  • What will success look like from this point over these time periods?
  • How can you have a conversation with your key customers to understand how they really measure you?
  • What can you change that will improve success against these measures?
  • What are you measuring ‘because you always have’ that doesn’t really add any value?
  • How might you replace these with measures that really matter especially to a customer?
  • Do you value performance measurement – is it part of your everyday language?

 

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